The Environment

Some Topics

 

YINYANG

Climate Change

Global data showed that a powerful El Niño in 2016, marked by warmer waters in the tropical Pacific Ocean, helped to drive atmospheric temperatures well past 2014's record highs. Some researchers suggest that broader Pacific trends could spell even more dramatic temperature increases in years to come. The global temperature data come from three independent records maintained by NASA, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the UK Met Office. All three data sets document unprecedented high temperatures in 2015, pushing the global average to more than 1 C above pre-industrial levels. [i] The year 2016 was the hottest on record.

NASA’s Global Climate Change website announced in August 2016: ”Two key climate change indicators — global surface temperatures and Arctic sea ice extent — have broken numerous records through the first half of 2016, according to NASA analyses of ground-based observations and satellite data. Each of the first six months of 2016 set a record as the warmest respective month globally in the modern temperature record, which dates to 1880, according to scientists at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York. The six-month period from January to June was also the planet's warmest half-year on record, with an average temperature 1.3 degrees Celsius warmer than the late nineteenth century.” NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies reported that January 2017 was the third warmest January in 137 years.[ii]

Galvania et al wrote: ”As the global human population continues to grow, so too does our impact on the environment. The ingenuity with which our species has harnessed natural resources to fulfill our needs is dazzling. The escalating extent of anthropogenic actions destabilizes long-standing ecological balances. The dangers of mining, refining, and fossil fuel consumption now extend beyond occupational or proximate risks to global climate change. Among a plethora of environmental problems, extreme climate events are intensifying. Storms, droughts, and floods cause direct destruction, but also have pervasive repercussions on food security, infectious disease transmission, and economic stability that take their toll for many years. For example, within weeks of the catastrophic wind and flood damage from the 2016 Hurricane Matthew in Haiti, there was a dramatic surge in cholera, among other devastating repercussions. In a world where 1% of the population possesses 50% of the wealth, those worst affected by extreme climatic events and the aftermath are also the least able to rebound.”

Benko wrote: ”Climate change is not equally felt across the globe, and neither are its longer term consequences. Forced migration of humans is one of the least understood consequences. The United Nations identified 64 million “persons of concern,” whose numbers have tripled since 2005. The numbers of humans at risk correlates with climate turmoil, represented by data from NASA’s Common Sense Climate Index. The correlation is striking. Climate change is a threat multiplier: It contributes to economic and political instability and also worsens the effects. It propels sudden-onset disasters like hurricanes, floods, storms and slow-onset disasters like drought and desertification. These disasters contribute to failed crops, famine and overcrowded urban centers; those crises inflame political unrest and worsen the impacts of war, which leads to even more displacement. There is no internationally recognized legal definition for “environmental migrants” or “climate refugees,” so there is no formal reckoning of how many have left their homes because climate change has made their lives or livelihoods untenable. In a 2010 Gallup World Poll, though, about 12 percent of respondents — representing a total of 500 million adults — said severe environmental problems would require them to move within the next five years.[iii]

[i] Nature 20 January 2016.
[ii] NASA Global Climate Change. March 8, 2017
[iii] Jessica Benko . How a Warming Planet Drives Human Migration. Climate displacement is becoming one of the world’s most powerful — and destabilizing — geopolitical forces. NYT Climate Issue APRIL 19, 2017

 
  • Discussions of Environmental Science and Human Ecology were developed by Environmed Research Inc. Sechelt, B.C. Canada. Online Topics were developed from the 2017 book, The Environment. You will find detailed information about the sun, weather, soils, forests, oceans, atmosphere, air pollution, climate change, water resources, air quality, energy sources, and preserving habitats. The Environment is available from Alpha Online as a Printed book or as an eBook Edition for Download.
    The Authoris Stephen Gislason MD
  • Download The Environment as an eBook.

  • Also Read Air and Breathing.
    This book helps you understand air quality issues, normal breathing and the causes of breathing disorders.
     

    Persona Book Orders

    Click Add to Cart buttons to begin an order for mail delivery (US and Canada). All books can be downloaded as PDF files. Click the Download buttons to order eBooks for download. Click the book titles (center column) to read topics from each book.

    Print Books Read Topics Download
    Human Nature
    The Good Person
    The Puzzle
    The Environment
    The Sound of Music
    Surviving Human Nature
    Language and Thinking
    I and Thou
    Emotions and Feelings
    Neuroscience Notes
    Human Brain
    Children and Family
    Intelligence
    Religion, 21st Century

    Google Search Alpha Online

     
    Alpha Online

    alpha online

    Alpha Online is a Web Site developed by Environmed Research Inc. Sechelt, B.C., Canada. Online Since 1995. Orders for printed books, eBooks and nutrient formulas are placed at Alpha Online. Alpha Nutrition is a registered trademark of Environmed Research Inc.